Art as Decoration

Art as Decoration

Whenever you can, we like to become. And the time at is always different. Occasionally we are working with a customer that’s been collecting for some time, and in this instance, we carefully consider their pieces from the start of the undertaking, sensitive to the colour and material of each and how it relates to the insides we are creating. Other jobs begin with no artwork and we are tasked with assisting the customer collect a collection. While the colour, pattern, shape and texture of the furnishings, wall coverings, and floor sheets always reflect the customer’s tastes and interests, often times that the truest representation of their interests and personalities stems through the artwork on their walls; it is what makes each room feel so distinctive. Within this woman’s research we designed for an executive who regularly works at home, we could pull off a blue paint colour knowing that the artwork on the wall are this picture and bold composition. At Lauren’s flat, she and her husband have a growing selection of modern artwork and are continuously putting up new bits and new ones that are old. From Kim McCarty they paired a Jonas Wood print on one wall.   For Your Hampton’s Showhouse Entrance and stairs, we selected the work of Nathan Coe, a  Nantucket established photographer, specializing in fine art and fashion photography. For a well-traveled gentleman study Founded in chocolate brown linen we hung the work of Edward S. Curtis, an American photographer whose work concentrated on the American West and in Native American people. Within this family room for a house at Carroll Gardens Brooklyn, we curated a selection of 19th century Japanese woodblock prints of braided knots, framed them wrapped them into a tight grid.   Within this tranquil, silent bedroom, the work of photographer Roni Horn mounted over the mantel has a calming effect. It is paired with a painted piece by Lily Ludlow over the outer wall. At a Greek Revival style house with a relatively traditional living room, we selected this big framed Josef Albers “Homage to the Square” in the 1970’s. It was only what the room required to throw things off-balance. Thinking about the way you can improve your insides with artwork is actually important. In the day’s end, it is about finding pieces you adore personally. You’ll treasure them forever and always find a place for them into your house!

  • Have loved Kim McCarty’s work in the minute I saw it to the cover of Statistics of Work. Entertaining to see it!

  • Some tips for using art. Thanks!

  • These are excellent ideas. Art is the best decor, bravo for the options,I particularly enjoy the combo of many frames, they all look lovely